A Brief Introduction to Petymila Berries

Petymila is a relatively unknown name in the world of bonsai tree care, but it has recently received a lot of attention. In fact, Petymila has been featured in a couple of National Geographic Magazines. One of Petymila’s opponents is Livejasmin, which have some similar points of view, but focuses more on professional bonsai growers. My review of Petymila will compare the two and conclude with my personal conclusions about both. After all, your bonsai tree should be a representative of your style and interests, so choose wisely.

Both Petymila and Livejasmin have roots that are actually underground. Theirs is not the same as an indoor Bonsai pot. The difference is that Petymila has a slipperier surface to help maintain the humidity levels needed in order for the plant to thrive. It also has holes in the upper part of the pot for air flow. Livejasmin has a solid hard surface with no indentations, which prevents moisture from draining, but it does have one distinct advantage over Petymila – it is easier to clean.

Livejasmin has one horizontal branch that separates the main two branches. On the other side of this branch are eight smaller branches that support the lower part of the trunk. Each of these branches has a shallow crease in the bark to help keep pests out. In addition, each of these branches has two small hooks attached to it that allow you to pull up the roots without damaging the tree.

I believe that Livejasmin is better suited for beginners because it has less formal drainage than most potted saplings. This is because the roots are so close to the soil, and when watered they do not drain as quickly as the roots in a potted tree. This type of sapling will also grow roots at an angle, which is a definite bonus if you want to grow a larger tree. However, if you are only growing a single tree then Livejasmin is definitely an option that you can consider. It is the easiest to care for and it is a very forgiving plant.

Petymila grows well in a variety of soil conditions, including sand, coco coir and rock wool. I prefer to use the latter so that the soil can drain properly. However, both types of soil are equally effective in covering the tree branches so you will not be seeing any bare spots on your tree. My favorite is sand because the little roots stay quite healthy there and you do not have to water as often.

One final consideration is how well the plant grows when it is planted into a container. The biggest problem is when the branches of the plant are touching each other, and the roots may overlap. If this is the case, pinch off a couple of leaves until the plant spreads out a bit more. Then repot the plant in about six to eight weeks, allowing three to four inches of space between each potted branch. The Petymila tree will fill up quickly with blooms and you will wonder why you did not purchase this gorgeous specimen years ago.